Windows 7: Hibernation Mode

September 28, 2010

Wow,  it’s been a while since I posted on here, but I’m back…for now. Anyways, I recently started trying out Hibernation mode on my laptop, and I though I would share with you guys what it’s like, and of course, if it is worth the upgrade or not.

Well, by default, Hibernation mode is enabled, but can be disabled easily using a registry tweak or a program such as TuneUp Utilities. If you do decide to disable it, you might notice that at least 2 GB suddenly became free. This is because when Windows 7 saves your current state, it takes a whack load of memory to do so. Depending on how many programs you have going, this might range from 2 GB to 10 GB.

When you are shutting your computer down, it is very, very, very slow. There is no Windows 7 back splash saying “Saving Your Settings” or anything, just a black screen. So instead, you have to wait until the power light turns off.

When you are turning on though, you will amazed at how fast it starts up, as if you put it into Hibernation, it will take 15 – 30 seconds to start up, compared to the minutes that some people encounter. But, there is no start up sound, which might be a bit of a pain, but you’ll enjoy the fast start up, if, you are willing to trade around 5 GB for it.

And of course, all the previously opened Windows will remain exactly the same, which is handy for those who take their laptop to work and sit there, waiting impatiently for Firefox or Microsoft Office to open. If you put it into Hibernation mode, Office or Firefox will instantly be ready for use, no wait times at all.

So, Hibernation mode could use a little less memory and have a back splash when shutting down, and possibly a start up sound, but the start up speed and the programs that you left open will remain ready for use, will definitely make this worth the upgrade.

Windows 7: Hibernation Mode? Worth It

Windows 7: Windows Media Player 12

March 7, 2010

   Hey guys. Sorry it’s been so long, but I’m ready to get typing up why or why not you should get the not-so-new Windows 7 operating system.

   Windows 7 includes the new Windows Media Player 12, along with Windows Media Center, but today we are going to focus on the Media Player.

   Now, first off, the design has changed and it does look a lot more like a Windows 7 type Media Player. The look and feel when you are using it is relaxing, and even though I have another main Media Player for adding songs onto my MP3 and iPod, I still always find myself using the pre-included Windows Media Player 12.

   Windows Media Player 12 not only looks good, but it features new parts in it, like the built-in burning and syncing feature, so you can make a music CD or add the songs to a MP3 (sorry, no iPods) very quickly. But, like always, you can add the songs that you downloaded off the internet, or now you can buy them from the built-in store, which is nice knowing that you have the option for those of you who are very careful of what you are downloading.

   Now, as most of you know, the Windows 7 taskbar is bigger, and that the Media Player toolbar would be too small for it, so instead of finding a way around this, Microsoft removed it all together. However, when you place your mouse over the icon on the taskbar (with it playing a song, and only with Aero enabled), you will not only notice a preview, but the play/pause, and next and previous buttons, which work quite well. I do think that this doesn’t replace the toolbar, but it does just about everything that it did do.

   So, now that I’ve given you a few ideas to get you thinking, if you were a person who always enjoyed the built-in, free Media Player, then you have nothing to worry about, because the one with Windows 7, is just as good, if not better.

   Windows 7: Windows Media Player 12? Worth it!

Windows 7: 64-Bit

February 13, 2010

   As you know, if you plan on buying a new laptop, you’ll notice that 3/4 of the times, they will be with Windows 7 64-bit. Why?

   Windows 7 64-Bit is the only Windows 7 operating system that supports 4 GB of RAM or higher. But, why? Well, the 32-bit versions will only support up to 3 GB of RAM.

   RAM is known as Random Access Memory, which the more RAM you have, the faster your PC will run and the more programs you can have running at once. For example, I currently own a Windows Vista 32-Bit with 2 GB’s & Windows Vista 64-Bit with 4 GB’s. What’s the difference? Windows Vista 64-Bit held up to 100 programs running at once, whereas 32-bit only help up to about 50 programs.

   Also, if you’re running a 64-Bit machine, you’re in luck. 64-Bit seams a lot faster at opening and running programs, and also with the extra RAM, you are able to run bigger programs like Adobe Premiere Pro CS4, which requires at least 2 GB of RAM to run.

   So, although you might have a harder time running some programs on it, the only program that I’ve had problems with running a 32-bit program is iTunes. Otherwise, just about all 32-bit programs will run, but if you have Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate, you can also run them in XP mode, which might result in better performance.

   Windows 7: 64-Bit? Worth it!

Windows 7: Start-up & Shutdown

January 31, 2010

   Well, after concluding that Windows 7 is worth it for the Aero theme, it’s time to talk about the speed of the start-up & shutdown.

   The start-up itself is fast, and sometimes too fast for it to handle. Sometimes, the start-up tune comes before the login screen, which does become annoying, because you could be out of the room, hear the sound, run back, and it be a black screen. But the login process and the Welcome screen happens fast, and once your desktop shows up, you are good to go.

   The shutdown goes smoothly, and doesn’t take more then 30 seconds for me, which is nice because I close my laptop when I’m not using it. The only thing is, you have to wait a few seconds after you exit your programs, because otherwise, you will get the screen saying: “These programs are preventing Windows from shutting down”. But, unless it’s a document or something along those lines, you are ok to force it, but it usually closes without clicking anything.

   When you are un-locking your Windows 7 machine, the unlocking process goes very fast, along with Hibernating & waking up from Sleeping.

   so, in conclusion, Microsoft doesn’t exaggerate when they say “Windows 7 is the fastest at starting up and shutting down”, in fact, they are not lying!

   Windows 7: Start-up & Shutdown Speed: Worth It!

Windows 7: Aero Theme

January 28, 2010

   Hey guys! So, today I have decided to talk about the new Aero theme in Windows 7. Now, yes it has changed from Windows Vista, but, is Windows 7 worth getting for the new Aero theme?

   Well, if you have used Windows Vista, you will know that there are new features that were not in Windows Classic or the Luna theme, like the new minimize, maximize & close buttons, along with the thumbnail previews, start button, and the transparency.

   Yes, those features have changed technology, but Windows 7 changed it some more. Windows 7 now features constantly transparent title bars, swap around applications on the task bar, and thumbnails that when hovered over, preview the window.

   Let’s start with the task bar, or as people refer it as the ‘Super Bar’. This new task bar is the first major change since it’s introduction in Windows 95. The new glowing start button is about the only change to the start menu. However, the application icons are different. They still have the quick launch toolbar…or do they? Instead, in Windows 7, it is not known as the Quick Launch, it is known as ‘Pinning The Item To The Task Bar’. Instead of the application opening in a new tab on the task bar, they open over the Pinned icon, saving you room. But, you don’t only save room there. You also now only have the icons showing, and not the title of them, but they do show up once you hover over it. The task bar also now features button glowing when you go over the tab. Eg. When I place my cursor over an open Firefox tab, it turns an orange colour. Thunderbird turns blue, Media Player 12 turns orange, Live Messenger doesn’t really have one, and LimeWire is green, and the list continues. Also, at the end of the task bar, you have the time and date showing, which is nice. But, beside that, you’ll see a rectangle, which when hovered over, shows your desktop, and a glass appearance of any windows that are running.

   The glass look of the desktop when windows are running is a new feature, called Aero Peek, which lets you view your desktop while having the windows in a transparent view.

   Aero Snap is another feature, which I use a lot on Windows 7. Just simply hold down your left button and drag your cursor to the left to make it half way from the left, to the right to make it half way to the right, and to the top to make it full screen. This feature replaces the hold Ctrl and click on 2 tabs on the task bar, right-click, and click Show Windows Side-By-Side, as now you just drag them to the side you want, and enjoy, which is a lot faster and easier.

   Aero Shake is the last new Aero feature I’m going to talk about, which I have never used this feature. This feature basically allows you to go from a bunch of windows on the screen, to focusing on 1 in a matter of seconds, but just holding the left button on the title bar, and shaking your mouse or cursor, while minimizing all other windows. To get them back, just simply shake it again.

   So, that’s what is new in the Aero theme, but, is Windows 7 worth getting for the Aero theme? Well, if your system can handle the theme, then I would get Windows 7, because the new Aero features will definitely be liked, and most of them used. Especially if your on a website that you’re not supposed to be on, just use the rectangle on the right side of the task bar to see your desktop in 2 seconds!

   Windows 7: Aero Theme: Worth It!

Introduction

January 26, 2010

Hey guys! So, as you can tell this is a new blog, and I am still experimenting with it, but I plan to have to have it running good soon! Anyways, there is a reason why I started this blog, which is because I don’t always think that Windows 7 is as good as people make it sound. So, I’m going to tell you why, and I’ll try to back up my opinion. Before you go asking, I do have a Windows 7 Home Premium OS running on my new Toshiba Satellite laptop, and it runs good for the most part. So, I’ll try to do a new post here at least once a week, and give you the result on if I think Windows 7 is worth it.